New study into dental phobic patients by University of Hong Kong: YouTube videos used for research.

Our team here works hard at helping phobic patients and we can use sedation techniques to help patients overcome their fears in attending for appointments.

It’s an important service we offer patients and our entire team is used to looking after those patients who have difficulties in feeling relaxed or confident about the dental clinic environment.
Our colleague Jamie Maguire has a particular focus on patients sedation and you can read more about our sedation treatments by clicking here.

Jamie Maguire has a focus on sedation for patients at Philip Friel Advanced Dentistry in Glasgow.

Jamie Maguire – has a particular focus on sedation for phobic patients.

According to DentalNews.co.uk a new study at the University of Hong Kong which used YouTube as a platform has revealed multiple manifestations and impacts of dental fear and anxiety, including immediate physical reactions (eg, crying, screaming, and shivering), psychological responses (eg, worry, upset, panic, helplessness, insecurity, resentment, and hatred), and uncooperativeness in dental treatment.

Testimonials from children, adolescents, and their parents suggested diverse origins of dental anxiety, namely personal experience (eg, irregular dental visits and influence of parents or peers), dentists and dental auxiliaries (eg, bad manner, lack of clinical skills, and improper work ethic), dental settings (eg, dental chair and sounds), and dental procedures (eg, injections, pain, discomfort, and aesthetic concerns).

The selected YouTube videos were transcribed verbatim. Non-verbal expressions such as facial expressions and body postures were also described.

A panel of three members consisting of a paediatric dentist, a behavioural scientist/public health practitioner, and a layperson with no dental background, read through the transcripts and watched each video carefully to ensure that the context was precisely understood and documented.

The research concludes that dental anxiety is better prevented than treated, through coordinated efforts of dentists, dental auxiliaries, pediatric patients, and their parents.

You can read more details about this study by clicking here.